8. HORSE CHESTNUT


8- HORSE CHESTNUT

There are 13 species of horse chestnut but none are native to Ireland. Mostly seen is Aesculus hippocastanum, a large statuesque tree adorned with large clusters of white flowers in May. In autumn the green spiky fruit crack open for a round brown nut to fall out. The brown nut is often called a conker.

MATURE HORSE CHETNUT TREE IN BLOOM- GALWAY UNIVERSITY

MATURE HORSE CHETNUT TREE IN BLOOM- GALWAY UNIVERSITY

Although the horse chestnut is too big for all but the largest of gardens, there are some othe smaller growing species that are more shrub like in growth.

CONKERS- HORSE CHESTNUT FRUIT ARE NOT EDIBLE.

CONKERS- HORSE CHESTNUT FRUIT ARE NOT EDIBLE.

A pink flowered A. x carnea is sometimes seen and used as a street tree.

PINK HORSE CHESTNUT - AESCULUS X CARNEA

PINK HORSE CHESTNUT – AESCULUS X CARNEA

Horse chestnuts are not eaten. The edible chestnuts come from a completely unrelated tree called Castanea sativa.